Flying Scotsman Will Run Again Soon

Update On Restoration Project

Exciting news as restoration of the famous Flying Scotsman steam locomotive is nearing completion.

Trials are due to commence later this year, with a view to some specials early in 2016.

This engine visited Australia in the 1980s and double headed with Australian Pacific 3801 which is also undergoing restoration, although not with the same resources.

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I am sure many railway enthusiasts around the world are relishing the thought of seeing this engine in steam again.

There are some great pictures of the restoration here, with a video of 4472 in action at the end.

 

By John Hutchinson for MailOnline

Published: 07:50 EST, 19 July 2015 | Updated: 11:28 EST, 19 July 2015

Iconic locomotive the Flying Scotsman is nearing a return to the train tracks.

After more than a decade out of action, the finishing touches are being put on the restoration project that could see the steam train return to service in a matter of months.

The locomotive was bought by National Railway Museum in 2004 for £2.3 million with costs of the restoration currently at £4.2m. The successful bid included £415,000 raised by the public and £365,000 donated by Sir Richard Branson, plus a £1.8m grant from the National Heritage Memorial Fund.

Co-director Colin Green (centre) takes part in restoration work on the Flying Scotsman steam train in Bury, Greater Manchester

Co-director Colin Green (centre) takes part in restoration work on the Flying Scotsman steam train in Bury, Greater Manchester

The iconic locomotive has been out of action since 2005 when a period of restoration work started on the train

The iconic locomotive has been out of action since 2005 when a period of restoration work started on the train

The Flying Scotsman is scheduled to make a return to the mainline train tracks this year after a decade out of action

Bob Gwynne, curator of collections and research at the National Railway Museum, said Flying Scotsman’s inaugural main line run from London to York is scheduled to be the opening event for the museum’s February Flying Scotsman Season.

He said: ‘The fitting of the equipment for the mainline really makes its return a reality.

‘We still anticipate that the restoration work to return Flying Scotsman to steam will be completed in late 2015. This will be followed by a full programme of running in tests on heritage lines.

‘Once it has built up sufficient mileage on the mainline – 1,000 miles under its belt – and it’s resplendent in its new BR green livery it will be ready for its long-anticipated inaugural run between London and York – a triumphant return home at long last.’

The work on the Flying Scotsman is being carried out undertaken by Riley & Son Ltd in Bury, Greater Manchester who were appointed to complete the work in Autumn 2013 as an outcome of their successful tender bid to take on the high-profile work to bring a national steam icon back to the mainline.

‘We have come through all the critical milestones for a locomotive restoration and although there is a lot of work still to get through and parts to fit, there is nothing significant standing in the way of Scotsman coming back to steam,’ said Riley’s co-director Colin Green.

Paul Kirkman, director of the National Railway Museum, said: ‘We are still progressing towards completing the restoration this year and we are planning a whole season of events and activities from February 2016 celebrating this star locomotive in our collection.’

Restoration work on the Flying Scotsman

Restoration work on the Flying Scotsman

The extensive restoration work has been carried out by a team of professionals, with meticulous planning throughout

The locomotive was bought by National Railway Museum in 2004 for £2.3 million with costs of the restoration currently at £4.2m

The locomotive was bought by National Railway Museum in 2004 for £2.3 million with costs of the restoration currently at £4.2m

The locomotive will retain the double chimney and smoke deflectors it carried when the museum acquired it in 2004

The locomotive will retain the double chimney and smoke deflectors it carried when the museum acquired it in 2004

The final works being undertaken at Bury include front end dimensioning, trialling and the final fit of components and reconstruction including the attachment of the new front buffer beam plate.

Once the return to mainline operation is complete, a commercial partnership agreement has been reached, under which Riley & Son Ltd will manage the operation of the locomotive for a period of two years.

This will include a programme of ongoing maintenance and helping to resolve any issues that may arise.

Built in Doncaster in 1923, the locomotive was named the ‘Flying Scotsman’ after the London to Edinburgh rail service which had been running since 1862, and was the first train to complete the 392-mile route non-stop on May 1, 1928, as well as being the first to break the 100mph barrier in 1934.

Since then it has had various owners including record producer Pete Waterman, and has toured the United States and Australia where it set its second world record, for the longest non-stop run by a steam locomotive.

In 1948, with the nationalisation of the railways, it was renumbered again and painted Brunswick Green. The museum has decided to stick with the British Railways Green 60103 livery for the restoration.

The Flying Scotsman made a special charter journey in 2005 before being moved to the National Railway Museum in York for complete restoration.

It is hopes the iconic steam train will return to scenes such as this, pictured in 1999 at Kings Cross Rail Station in London

It is hopes the iconic steam train will return to scenes such as this, pictured in 1999 at Kings Cross Rail Station in London

Curator of Collections and Research at the National Railway Museum Bob Gwynne checks on restoration work on the Flying Scotsman

Curator of Collections and Research at the National Railway Museum Bob Gwynne checks on restoration work on the Flying Scotsman

The Flying Scotsman was bought by National Railway Museum in 2004 for £2.3 million with restoration work beginning the following year

The Flying Scotsman was bought by National Railway Museum in 2004 for £2.3 million with restoration work beginning the following year

Built in Doncaster in 1923, the locomotive was named the 'Flying Scotsman' after the London to Edinburgh rail service which had been running since 1862

Built in Doncaster in 1923, the locomotive was named the ‘Flying Scotsman’ after the London to Edinburgh rail service which had been running since 1862

Here is a video of the Flying Scotsman in action

 

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